Posts in Category: architecture

Raising The Bug Bar

In our quest to find the latest, greatest and bestest methodologies out there to ship great software we often overlook the simplest of implementations to get a project going – The Bug Bar.

As much as I wish this was an actual bar a la Bugs, it’s not.

bugs.jpg

The Bug Bar is a simple tool used to keep your team’s head above water when shipping copious amounts of software against an unpredictable schedule.

How it Works

Before each iteration set a maximum number of bugs that can be reported that cannot be triaged into a subsequent iteration based on their priority and severity to the project.

There is no discerning between bugs raised by Developers, QA,

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Great Software NEEDS Requirements

I think it would be pretty cool to have had some IoT on my keyboard for all the code I have written to tell me how many lines I have written over the years.

But I would love to cross-reference that statistic with how much code I have rewritten based on poor requirements.

How much code I deleted?

How much code I had to update?

How much time was loss?

I generally try to keep to code on this blog but at the core of every great release are the requirements that are built at the beginning, middle and end.  Do a bad job on those and I can guarantee what the end result will be.

When jumping onto a new project or product, the first thing I always do is sit down with the user and

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A Scaled out CRM Solution Architecture

Recently I started work on a pretty big CRM project and I wanted to apply a more scaled out approach to my solution architecture.  CRM offers a great facility to deploy code in their solutions but when starting a new project you should always ask yourself the following questions before you starting adding entities into your solutions.

  1. What is the frequency of updates that will be requested by the users and to what components?
  2. Are there multiple users contributing to this project?
  3. How big do you expect this project to grow by?
  4. What kind of promotional model is in place for deployments?

I  have found that questions such as these generally drive the overall solution architecture I will put in place on a project.  For instance, if we are working with a client that has

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Using Dynamics365 as a Queue for Data Synchronization

Over the years, I’ve migrated a lot of data from on-premise systems into Dynamics365 (whether they be existing CRM system, homegrown solutions or off the shelf packages).  I’ve used a number of third-party tools to accomplish these tasks (Scribe and Kingsway) but have also written my own when the need arose.

On a recent project, faced with yet more synchronization requests and the need for more infrastructure to manage changes, mediate conflicts, prevent ping-ponging data writes, etc, etc.  I started to change my thinking from being able to have everything on-premise (i.e., the ability to queue up new Virtual Images and tons of server space et al) to think of how I solve this problem if all I had was Dynamics365 and the server I am moving data from.

To

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Getting Started with Windows IoT

I recently bought a Windows IoT kit from Adafruit and started to play around with it last week.  IoT (Internet of Things) is one of those things that I don’t use during the day job and instead, I’m playing with completely on my own.

I should also note that this is my first foray into doing any work with hardware (apart from working with SDKs that would control switches).

If you are like me and this is completely new and foreign territory to you, start with the tutorials located here.

In setting everything up, I had some initial problems with using the WiFi connect and instead opted for a wired LAN connection so I could rule this out as a possible error.

I am currently running Visual Studio 2017, and even with the

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